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tommyflan

What is your biggest property turn-off?

Tom Flanagan
7 years ago
When looking for a new home, first impressions most certainly count. It's important to always see the potential in a property, but equally there are a multitude of factors that can put a buyer off - for me it's clutter and mess!

What's your biggest property peeve - clutter, evidence of smoking, or even just an unmade bed? Leave us a comment and let us know!
Eco Development · More Info

Comments (103)

  • 163 hrd
    6 years ago

    We did not buy the house with a WC in the living room. I kid you not. The owner should have thought harder about removing the wall separating the living room from the hallway.

  • PRO
    Sue Murphy Interiors
    6 years ago

    Sufficient available space to work with is important… that doesn't necessarily mean a huge space, but enough for your own personal needs, whether inside or outside of the house. And scary neighbours!

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  • mayfly182
    6 years ago

    - Newly done up in neutral colours! Especially a cheap new kitchen and bathroom with beige or white tiles. It increases the value of the property and effectively means I'm paying them to have done decoration in a style which isn't mine. Why would I want that?
    - Fresh paint on what could be a damp area. It makes me wonder what they're trying to hide.
    - Woodchip wallpaper. Most people don't realise just how long it usually takes to get off, and it nearly always means replastering will also be needed.
    - Artex.

  • PRO
    colourhappy
    6 years ago

    Totally agree with Mayfly. Then estate agents tell you it's got a new (crap) kitchen and new (crap) bathroom as if you are going to start going wild with excitement.

  • gilliifer
    6 years ago

    Dirt, smoking, sad or angry owners, dogs. Not bothered about decor as it can be changed. Hate garden ponds. So dangerous when you have small children or grandchildren. Unattractive exterior which cant be improved.

  • PRO
    Amber Jeavons Ltd
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Hello Tom, For me it would be either the aesthetic of the design, location, noisy neighbours.... Furnishings and interior choices wouldn't put me off if they can be changed with the budget I had... I don't need to see a show home to see any potential or know if the place is right.. I don't even need to see any furnishings... I'd rather a blank slate.. I do hate when people buy a place and put in a new kitchen that you know you will have to change because it's terrible.... That is a shame and a waste... I hate to see so much waste... (of course you can re-use the cabinets... change the doors etc but yes to less waste! The other thing of course is original features missing... That really annoys me gr8ly! :))

  • PRO
    User
    6 years ago
    Not much will put me off but I can't tolerate low ceilings (which rules out a lot of modern houses!). A downstairs loo that is off the kitchen or has to be accessed by going through another room is also a big turn-off for me. If it can't be relocated to a more central position, even if that's just under the stairs, I'm unlikely to like the house.
  • Mrs Shooty*
    6 years ago
    Ground floor flats really freak me out. I lived in one once and didn't sleep properly for six months! Also, houses with bedrooms on the ground floor are an absolute no. Even if there are say three bedrooms upstairs if there's a bedroom downstairs I'm utterly put off. It's totally illogical I know but...
    Also damp, no garage, and nowhere for a dining table are turn offs.
  • Olena Tkach
    6 years ago

    The worst things are mold and pests. I don't mind some spiders (here in Europe: if I lived in Australia, I'd not be so tolerant) and I can deal with some mold in the basement, but mold in the kitchen is the thing that screams 'Run way!' to me =)

    Among less extreme things there are smells and sounds, mostly. I don't like when unpleasant smells and sounds from outside come into the house (while the pleasant ones (like singing birds, blossoming trees and so on) may be the main reason to stay at this home). I don't like when the house has its own unpleasant smells. I don't like when you can't make a step on kitchen without it being heard through the whole house.


  • cavgirl
    6 years ago
    I'm a little confused about the hate for northerly gardens- maybe location is something to do with it? I'm in Northern Ireland with a north-North-west facing garden and it's fantastic from late afternoon on while the more desirable south side of the house is in comparative shadow.
  • stephboyle
    6 years ago
    We have a north facing garden and get sun all day long. The worse thing for me is nightmare neighbours! I will let you know about getting the woodchip off the walls! Just about to start renovating our new but old house.....
  • purplelore15
    6 years ago

    I really dislike pet smells. I am a proud cat owner but I would never want anyone to smell that fact upon entering my home. When my husband and I were house-hunting, we found a beautiful property and were quite excited until we opened the living room door and were hit with the most overpowering stench of dog that I have ever come across. We could not get out of there fast enough. I have friends with dogs and they manage to keep their homes smell-free. There really is no excuse, especially when trying to sell your property.

  • vehughes
    6 years ago

    I'm not put off by bad decor or even if there is massive amounts of re plastering and re flooring to do. What puts me off is when there is an entire household hanging around while viewing. I went into a flat where we couldn't see the bathroom because someone was in the shower and we couldn't see a bedroom because someone was still asleep. The rest of the family we're cutting about in pjs, it was 2pm. Very awkward wandering in and out of bedrooms when they are lying in their bed watching telly. I had a few similar situations but none quite as bad. I Much preferred if just one person was in gave a quick tour then left you to it.

    The other things that puts me off is when it's so obviously been staged and no one has ever lived in the perfect white box with pale carpets throughout or if a new expensive kitchen has been installed that is really not to your own taste and you would be paying that bit extra for the pleasure of ripping out a new usable but ugly kitchen.

    In the end though its size, location and light that matter to me. We recently bought a magnolia flat and are very happily painting and furnishing away the bland.

  • chookchook2
    6 years ago

    Bad neighbours, large costs to rectify structural problems.

  • Angelina I
    6 years ago

    vehughes not quite as bad as folk in showers and bed, but we once viewed a house whilst the owners had guests sitting around the table eating Sunday lunch. Why on earth arrange a viewing for that time if you knew you'd be doing that? We were so uncomfortable and didn't really look at the room.

    The worst viewing was the one where the owner collected his urine (that's not predictive text kicking in) in open glass bottles. Stored them along the stairs. A couple of bottles at the side of each stair. The walls smelt of cigarette smoke and were the yellow smokey colour.

    Decor and clutter I can see past. Smells and dirt I really can't.

  • chookchook2
    6 years ago

    Far out!

  • PRO
    Staged for Perfection
    6 years ago
    A dark, smelly house
  • Jan Johnson
    6 years ago

    I really enjoyed reading this, lots to think about. I have neighbours on a shared access who have too many cars, boats, holiday bus and trailer. they end up outside my place. I am always mentioning it and not popular. Some people have too much money to play with.

  • mv5869
    6 years ago

    uPVC windows. Don't like the things at all. Especially in a Victorian or Edwardian house.

    Apart from that, I biggest turn off are those big oversized words people put in their kitchen or on a mantlepiece. Things love LOVE, or SOAK. So trite. Grrrrr.

  • Julie B
    6 years ago
    Artex anywhere, weird smells, horrible neighbours, tiny kitchen, no hallway.
  • Jill Gittins
    5 years ago

    To put these peeves in perspective, here's a couple a photos I once found in Estate Agent's details (honestly!) Priceless!!!


  • Emmeline Westin
    5 years ago

    Haha, these are brilliant Jill! That dog in the first pic looks he's made the room into his own. I wonder what these properties went for...!

  • Bryan Lip
    5 years ago
    If the property has been repointed and the bricks cleaned at the front!
  • stabmonkey
    5 years ago

    Why is that bad Bryan? I was thinking of having my house repointed - but didn't think the bricks needed cleaning.

  • 163 hrd
    5 years ago

    Stabmonkey I don't get that one, either. Suppose bricks could need cleaning if on a busy road but otherwise see no advantage or indeed disadvantage.

  • PRO
    Amber Jeavons Ltd
    5 years ago
    I can see Bryan's point or perhaps apply his thinking to period properties particularly.. Repointing if done badly can ruin the look of brickwork. With sandblasting it can often ruin the appearance and take away the character of a house where the natural patina of the brick builds over time..

    It does depend on the brick but on an aesthetic level I am not keen on sandblasting or really bad repointing. :))
  • stabmonkey
    5 years ago

    If you look at furniture brochures or interior design magazines, they often will show a pet - usually a cute cat or dog, but they're not in a property brochure.

  • pennywatson85
    5 years ago

    Just about to sell my flat in London. Done a few bits and pieces over the last fews years (new bathrooms, carpet) and kept it looking smart with repainting as needed but once the tenants move out it will be empty. I've been recommended using a "house stager" to show, for example, that the double bedroom is really a double bedroom (not an oversized single one) and that you can get furniture up the spiral stairs into the attic that does indeed fit a bed and drawers. Does anyone have experience of this option either as a seller or buyer and what were your thoughts?

  • Stephen Edwards
    5 years ago

    Very little will put me off having a look, if it's in the right price range and in the right place. People's taste differs so the decor would not put me off. Even structural or maintenance issues wouldn't if the price was right. I'm not sure if I'm allowed to put this link, but it is a favourite of mine; if you want to see some really bad photographs that have been used to sell properties look no further. (Somewhere on there is the photograph of a kitchen/living room with a piano next to the sink and a full size pig lying on the floor with its head resting on the sofa)

    http://terriblerealestateagentphotos.com/

  • Claire M
    5 years ago
    Anything done up. Want somewhere to do up and make my own mark!
  • PRO
    Amber Jeavons Ltd
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    How Splendid Stephen Edwards,

    Piggies are gorgeous! Some very interesting decor on that link of yours... Superb in their ghastliness. I'm quite fascinated as people are often frightened of their decor, so it's gr8 to see the opposite... Ah yes.. Eric can be found on the wildlife page.. They (pigs) are in fact very clean animals and so probably hated his surroundings.. :))

  • PRO
    Amber Jeavons Ltd
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Hello pennywatson85,

    I offer a styling service as it's really better known.. If you're in need. So you can show the rooms off to their pinnacle of potential. :))

  • PRO
    Ecoflap
    5 years ago

    Two conflicting things - overly bright decoration, but also the beige-out of much modern styling. I've been looking at property a great deal recently and realised many houses just weren't sticking in my mind as they were all decorated in shades of greige. I like homes that show individuality, but not a deep need for bright red, purple and blue in every room!

  • twamleyk
    5 years ago

    A few people have said a north facing garden. We bought our house two years ago with a north facing garden - to be honest, we hadn't put much thought into it. The back of the house is darker, but we have a glass extension/conservatory and I don't think it would be viable in a south facing or west facing garden, and it brings great light into the kitchen. As for warmth in the garden, we have a lovely seating area at the end of the garden, but normally when I am in the garden I am looking for shade as I find it too hot (we live in London). So it has worked out well for us and we have a lovely sunny sitting room at the front.

    I hate to see PVC front door and windows in a victorian house - but again, our house has this. The price of the house and location made up for it, but changing those windows is expensive so we are saving up for it!

  • Kellyanne Ward
    5 years ago
    The house I'm buying is most of this and more minus the flag , it's my dream house , I can't wait to get in there and rip the orange vertical blinds down rip every bathroom and stinky toilet out , change the old carpet , condemn the kitchen to the skip and get rid of the awful stench , I know just one day I will turn the house around imagine what 6 months will do , what puts me off properties now is when they are right on the road , no hall way , or a front door straight into the living area , I dislike Windows that are not in the centre of walls and tiny landings .
  • Simon R
    5 years ago
    My wife and I went to view a property and there was weird white bits all over the kitchen floor. The owner told us "it's OK, my dog has a skin problem!". We poked around quickly and left with the obligatory "we'll let you know". Love the England flag comment!
  • moiraford
    5 years ago
    Pebbledash, artex ceilings, upvc windows.
    Currently got the match ball at my house!
  • PRO
    Kitchenrooms
    5 years ago
    Cheap kitchen
  • Coco Nuts
    5 years ago

    I abhor rooms with walls set at an angle particularly in a hallway.

  • Patrina
    5 years ago
    cracks, cracks, cracks I'm OUT the door!!!!
  • jack howe
    5 years ago

    Aluminium window frames, concrete roofing tiles, pebble dash external walls, sky dish on front of house, stone cladding particularly coloured.

  • Daisy England
    5 years ago
    Metro tiles. Hate the sight of them regardless of what they are. They remind me of a local authority underground. Vile things. I'd have to smash them off.

    I detest the thump thump of a football. I'd puncture that!

    Thirdly yappy dogs. Don't their owners understand controlling them to avoid the annoying the neighbours. No saying what I'd do. Dirty, noisy animals.
  • viv mcc
    5 years ago

    untidy garden next door being

    full of old cars and junk. First impressions count for me if the surroundings are not nice I'd go no further. And cats sitting on the walls.where there are cats you can guarantee they will use your garden as a cat litter tray. I couldn't buy a house without a garden.

  • JesmondDene
    4 years ago

    UPVC Windows and doors, low ceilings and old houses where ever ounce of the original (gorgeous) features have been removed.

  • oldmanaudi
    4 years ago
    Dead plants in tubs, dustbins in front gardens, rubbish waiting to go to the tip and green plastic ball hanging from brackets!
  • AMB
    4 years ago
    The toilet seat and/or lid being left up.
  • AMB
    4 years ago
    New builds - ugly sweat-boxes that lack character and craftsmanship and are made of cardboard.
  • Resh
    4 years ago
    I have always bought wrecks - I love renovating: and I completely agree with overpaying for a new renovation that is rubbish and soulless: I won't even view a house that has obviously been done up by one of the many "property developers" that infest London. I can cope with anything (have rectified asbestos, removed wood chip, put back period features and replaced everything from roof to digging up a floor to install underfloor heating in the past), but my absolute nos: dodgy neighbours/road, lack of off-street parking (London), a floor plan I can do nothing with, lack of potential to add value myself. I have seen (and met) some real horrors whilst looking for houses! Also, I have to have a period house: 1930s or older.
  • Resh
    4 years ago
    My dream is to build my own house (here I would change my period house rule, as in the right location, a beautifully designed, modern ecohome would be fantastic). One rule here - no field next door that could be sold and an estate built next door...
  • PRO
    JML Garden Rooms
    4 years ago

    Damp and drafty homes!!

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