tora100

Opinions needed on this bungalow design.

Harri
4 years ago
What do you all think of the plan. I love the fact that the bungalow has the big kitchen diner and that there are 3 double bedrooms downstairs. Upstairs (hopefully) will have a guest bedroom and ensuite and a media room with a mezzanine floor overlooking the entrance area and dining/family room.

The bungalow is being designed with future proofing for a wheelchair but there's no wheelchair right now so wide doors/level access and wet rooms are included. Do you think the hall and entrance is too big, even with disability in mind?

We are seeing an architect in a few weeks time but I'd rather have a clear idea in my mind what I like before the meeting as I was guided into some decisions on my last project as, to be honest, I was clueless in both building procedures and what I wanted, I'd like more input this time.

Comments (32)

  • Harri
    Original Author
    4 years ago
    I also forgot to mention that there's a feature gable window on the gable end where the dining family room is and sliding doors out to the garden at the back of the family room.
  • acew1234
    4 years ago
    I'm not an expert so please ignore if you would rather!
    I think your ensuite is too small especially if it's to be wheel chair friendly.
    I'd also prefer a door from the entrance hall into the kitchen as at present you have to go thru the dining room to get there.

    I'm sure an architect will come up with some great layouts as it seems a big space to work with. Others on here will come up with great ideas too. Good luck!
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  • Harri
    Original Author
    4 years ago
    I hope so as I'm thinking the more ideas I come up with of things I like, the easier the process will be working with the architect.

    It would be amazing to get different opinions on here.
  • mouseshouse
    4 years ago
    Just a few pointers

    Lounge is tiny when compared to the hallway / entrance which seems wasted space as you will only be passing through.

    Is this a property that is already built or are the walls moveable ? If so there is a lot of wasted space with the oddly placed corridor walls and the 3rd bed also seems small, will the upsatairs bedroom be bigger if so would that become the master for the time being....

    We are renovating but also future proofing with wide access doors and ramps to front door ( slightly different as daughter has long term condition where wheelchair may become necessary in future ), but I think that properties that work for all stages of life are definitely an investment.

    Good luck your architect should have some good ideas
  • Jonathan
    4 years ago
    Another alternative layout. Before you speak to your architect you could get creative ideas from a concept planner who will help you visualise the finished property.
    I have tried to keep the plan in a more compact shape which means better space available upstairs. I also thought that you could have a fourth bedroom next to the master- you could use this as a dressing room but helps add value to the resale because it's an another room. I also thought that a door into the laundry from the bedroom wing has a practical benefit but also provides a private route to the kitchen.
  • Harri
    Original Author
    4 years ago
    The property is a new build so anything can change at this stage. The size of the hall was worrying me as it seems never ending.
  • PRO
    User
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    You could just make a slight adjustment to the bedrooms. The second bedroom is small and has an en-suite, so you can get more room out of that by amending the sites of the doors etc.

    In doing the above, the door from the third bedroom is now opposite the family bathroom.

    However, I agree with Jonathan about the concept planner and the layout. Your layout is good, but it leaves the lounge area very disjointed from the rest of the rooms and gives the most space to the dining room, where perhaps you would expect the living room.

    I think the bit that needs the most work is the kitchen / utility / pantry. Currently you go through the utility which takes up a whole wall, (currently with no units on it) to get to the pantry - quite inconvenient. The wall between the kitchen and dining area / family room I would say needs to come down. ( Jonathan's plan gives a much better option for all of the above )

  • kiwimills
    4 years ago
    owww clever !!
  • Jonathan
    4 years ago
    Upstairs to the downstairs option shown earlier
  • PRO
    Create Perfect
    4 years ago
    I agree with the comments above. The hall is too big for the space and whilst you can future proof this room doesn't need to be that large compared to the rest of the house. Carefully reorganising the space and access to rooms you can increase the size of your major rooms and cut the hallway space to a more manageable size.

    When concept planning, we personally, offer 3/5 different layout options for the properties with talk through (pros and cons) or each space which is presented in 3D images with a walk through video of the space. If you would like to see an example of what you receive please drop me a message and I'll send it over to you.

    It's worth getting it right as it's a new build home (with so many possibilities) which you're planning as your long time home. Having a run through and really knowing your ideas inside out before seeing your architect doesn't just give you piece of mind but can save thousands when it comes to architects designs fees and rewrite of plans. All the best. Gina
  • PRO
    StyleHaven
    4 years ago

    This looks absolutely fine.

  • PRO
    StyleHaven
    4 years ago

    Kitchen & flooring ideas

  • PRO
    PWJ Architects Ltd
    4 years ago

    Hi,


    Your architect may reconfigure your design so that it meets building regulations. Taking on a large project like this, you'll need to ensure you work with an architect/surveyor/building company that can offer project viability and liability most importantly, as this could save you on hidden costs later on in the design process if negative implications are not addressed early on.


    We're sure your architect will be able to combine their expertise in building knowledge and concept planning alongside your vision of how you wish to live.


    We hope this helps!

  • Jonathan
    4 years ago
    Enlarged do you can see it better
  • Harri
    Original Author
    4 years ago
    Thanks for all your comments. There wasn't going to be a wall between the kitchen and dining/family room (sorry, forgot to delete the wall before saving). A lot of what is being said here has been worrying me. The location of the pantry and lounge for example.

    What does everyone think of a Mezzanine floor? I always thought they gave a wow factor but "family advisors" just scream about the dead space you have to heat and wasted space.
  • Jonathan
    4 years ago
    I say if you have a mezzanine no more heat will rise than up the stairs that you would have had anyway, you don't have to heat all of the upstairs if you are not using it year round so you will only really be heating the upstairs landing and if you are worried about the downstairs hall being cold you can plan ahead with better heating in the hall.
    Energy efficiency- I say have the space you want and make efficiency savings elsewhere- no doubt your new boiler will be more efficient than your current one, you can build in additional insulation and you can take advantage of renewable energy such as solar panels and a ground source heat pump. You can also reduce other bills perhaps by recycling household water to water the garden
  • PRO
    User
    4 years ago

    I had a thought about this one over night ( sad but true ) - You specifically mentioned the hall being too large, yet there is no provision on that plan for a staircase. You also mentioned an upstairs. Is the upstairs a future project? In which case, it explains the need for the hall size especially if you need to accommodate a staircase.

  • Jonathan
    4 years ago
    I think Hugh has missed the stairs but in fairness the way the planning tool has drawn them makes them look narrow and perhaps mistaken for furniture.

    No doubt you have made some decisions ( because of the plot, and the position, and the privacy, and the views, and your needs, existing furniture you want to accommodate, and nearby housing stock and therefore what is likely to be granted permission). Decisions that we are not aware of and I am sure that you want the house to be interesting which is why you have vaulted windows and a mezzanine and a diagonal corridor. I do however think there is probably more to consider for your design to evolve.
    Personally I think it is odd to be faced with a solid wall when you enter the property- ideally you would have a sight line through to the garden. I think there are too many bathrooms unless you have live in staff or want separate bedrooms, in my opinion there is no obvious space for the bed in the main bedroom, the second bedroom seems to be oversized and the position of the lounge feels isolated. Perhaps you should consider an attached garage or a porch corchere for getting from the car to the house in the rain (which obviously takes longer with a wheelchair.). Is the wheelchair user the cook? in which case the kitchen probably needs to be bigger as more storage has to be low down- the pantry will also need to be rethought for wheelchair access.
    There are probably prudent considerations such as fridge drawers, lower level light switches, a wet room style shower, electric curtain closers, additional security, practical flooring, appropriate height toilets, somewhere for an electric wheelchair to be charged and stored overnight, room for any exercise equipment needed, flat door thresholds, ramps to get out of every door, you might also consider extra fire protection such as a sprinkler to give you more time to escape in the event of a fire.

    In the meantime you could post more details of the plot to see if any of the clever Houzz people have any plot specific ideas.
  • Harri
    Original Author
    4 years ago
    Hi, yes the stairs were there but due to the restrictions of my basic design program, it was either this one or the spiral, either way, the shape of the stairs probably needs a rethink as does my whole design. I agree with so much of what you've all said. It's really made me think as I want to get this right the first time (if possible). The only thing I know for sure right now is that I'm going to be a total nightmare for an architect.
  • acew1234
    4 years ago
    Just make sure you write a really good brief for the architect and put some mood boards together ( just stick everything you like on a large sheet) this will give the architect a good starting point.
    I was our architect's worst nightmare I'm sure although he was very polite and patient to my face.... Once we found the right architect ( not an easy task to find one on the right wavelength) it was an enjoyable process but very long .... make sure you get on with them! We have been in close contact with ours for just under 2 years.
  • PRO
    Stommel Haus UK
    4 years ago

    Hi, Just reading this in your discussion: "What does everyone think of a Mezzanine floor? I always thought they gave a wow factor but "family advisors" just scream about the dead space you have to heat and wasted space."

    A wow-factor is also a feel good factor, so in that instance it is not "dead space" but an uplifting space. You will feel great when coming home and admiring and enjoying your house. How could that be "dead space". Heat will not disappear if your house is built properly, i.e. if you work with a builder which builds an air-tight house. Air-tight means that there is no leakage where warm air disappears.

    I also find the comment "you don't have to heat all of the upstairs if you are not using it year round so you will only really be heating the upstairs landing and if you are worried about the downstairs hall being cold you can plan ahead with better heating in the hall. " rather odd. Keeping areas of the house unheated will just make the entire house colder, the warmth from downstairs will rise upstairs. Switching off heating does not reduce your heating bill as you require a lot of heat to warm the house up again. A steady good temperature in a well insulated house makes much more sense.

    We fit all houses with underfloor heating in a 70 mm thick screed, creating a heat sink. The very well insulated and air-tight house does not leak warm air to the outside. We build a lot of houses with open galleries and mezzanines and the heating bills are very low.

    If you are building in the UK and looking for a good reliable, high quality builder who sticks with the schedule and provides a fixed price, have a look at Stommel Haus UK. We would love to build your house.

  • Jonathan
    4 years ago
    I defend the statement about not heating rooms year round- this is after all why we have thermostats on radiators and room thermostats for underfloor heating so you can turn down where necessary. I would also point out that most of us have been in the loft and appreciated that it is cold, proving that with insulation between floors heat does not automatically rise into the space above. So you can have a media room upstairs and keep the heating to a minimum until it is needed.
    I do however agree that if you enjoy a vaulted space you mustn't consider it dead space plus underfloor heating is supposed to be better for heating voluminous spaces.
  • Jonathan
    3 years ago
    Any update on this Harri? Have you got an updated design?
  • Harri
    Original Author
    3 years ago
    Hi Jonathan.

    I will post an updated plan to see what you all think. The whole design has changed since this plan. The garage is now attached and we've decided to stay on one storey rather than have an extra room upstairs.
  • Harri
    Original Author
    3 years ago
    Hi. Attached is an updated plan I was working on over Christmas. Before anyone asks, I wasn't tipsy doing this, my PC packed in, so I drew everything freestyle on my phone, hence the occasional wonky lines. Anything can change inc measurements as it's only ideas to give to my architect who I've got an appointment with soon... if anyone would like to give their opinion on the plan, I'd really appreciate it.

    Some additional info:
    North - land currently for sale for a housing site
    East - best view. South - farm fields view
    West - views of neighbouring bungalows gardens.

    My plot is 1.75 acres. My hubby gets up at 5am for work so having a walk in wardrobe and ensuite next to each other means less walking through the bedroom when I'm sleeping.

    I love the glazed gable end as attached which I would like in the kitchen. I also like tall windows on either side of the fireplace in the lounge. I know many people split the location of bedrooms in a bungalow to reduce the hallways but as a mam to young ones, this isn't suitable for us. I should have put a study in this design somewhere but despite the size, I couldn't think where to place it.
  • Ellie
    3 years ago
    What is view like from Kitchen doors? Just garden view or is there chance you could have 3 storey houses overlooking you?
  • Jonathan
    3 years ago
    I think this layout looks great and other than a few minor suggestions I wouldn’t change much:-
    The garage isn’t long enough.
    I would make the utility bigger and add a door to the front and think about where to store recycling and bins.
    I would have a little more storage near the front door.
    I would make the dressing room bigger.
    I would swap the dressing and ensuite as it helps plan ahead for an extension (without having new plumbing)
  • Harri
    Original Author
    3 years ago
    Hi Ellie. The site of houses (if built) will be on the North side. South and East have fields from the local farm but East is far reaching views. The main views, being a bungalow will be our own garden. Jonathan, thrilled that you like the plans and your drawings have given me another perspective on the master.
  • Jonathan
    3 years ago
    Other half was watching rubbish on TV last night and I wasn’t interest so I had a play with designs and I thought I might as well post what I had come up with.

    I really like your concept ..... if these layouts inspire any additional thoughts then great.
  • PRO
    Fern Architectural Studio
    3 years ago
    Hi Harri, don't go to your architect with a set of plans. It is the worst thing one can do for the design process.
    Also if you have a predetermined idea of what you want you are less open to new ideas.
  • Jonathan
    3 years ago

    I kind of agree with Fern that it doesn't make sense to employ a creative individual and not allow them to be creative. Give them a brief and see what they come up with before showing your hand.

    You could also explore the creative side of things with a designer or a concept planner- likely at a lower price point than an architect.

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