kathyelizabeth87

Old bungalow conversion, new floor plan?

Shabby Bear Cottage
19 April, 2019
Hello all! We are in the process of wanting to completely redo an old bungalow we’re buying.
Due to having newborn twins, we are looking to get plans and get the work done as quickly as possible. Ideally we want to do a loft conversion of 2-3 bedrooms (neighbours have done so with dormer and no troubles), so it’s definitely something we will be doing in the future.
However, as we need to get moved in as quick as possible, and need to get a few rooms up to scratch before we can tackle big projects, we are thinking we need the floor plan to be completed first.
Would it be worth getting an architect at this stage or at a later date?
The front of the house is actually where the sitting room and kitchen is, and the garden is at the back with the bedrooms, so the layout feels very dated to me. Ideally we would like to go open plan and have a nice entry way and still keep 2 bedrooms downstairs. Do you think it’s possible looking at the current floor plan?
Any recommendations of professionals? :)
Thanks in advance!

Comments (19)

  • Jen P
    All looks liveable with? I’d personally just move in and spend the year seeing how the space and light works for you. I’d speak to some local loft conversion companies and architects (and also visit your neighbors to see what they did!). But I’d aim to get all the work done together eventually.

    We’ve been in our house just over a year, and our ideas certainly evolved over this time. It’s also meant that the rooms we knew wouldn’t be changing we’ve been able to decorate so we have spaces to enjoy our home, despite the awful kitchen we’ve been enduring ;)
  • PRO
    Shabby Bear Cottage
    Hi Jen,
    Sadly the boiler needs replacing and the interior is quite dated, so we would definitely need a rough idea I think to be able to know where to start and where the boiler should be installed. We essentially have until winter to do this so that the house can be kept warm. I’m also the type to want to start ASAP and get things moving haha! A couple of photos of the interior :)
  • Jonathan
    One option.
    Personally I would try to move the front door to the front, create a laundry space and this total of five bedrooms does give you options to use one as a living room or playroom.
  • PRO
    Shabby Bear Cottage
    Oh my that’s fantastic! I love the layout and having the entry way at the front! Looks like this would definitely maximise the space in the loft too! Thank you for posting!
    One question, where should I put the boiler??? :)
  • Jonathan
    Ps- make sure you can get planning permission to move your front door before putting your new boiler by your current entry
  • PRO
    Shabby Bear Cottage
    Ah!!!! Perfect!!! You are a superstar, thank you so much! I will do! :)
  • Jen P
    This may be a silly question but why do you need to move the boiler now? Just replace it, but tell the engineer you will be looking to do s loft conversion and possibly move it soon. No way I’d spend 500-1000 on moving a boiler unless I was 100% certain of where it would be spending the rest of its days!
  • Jen P
    Also may not be able to move to current entrance hall as flue would vent into porch??
  • Jonathan
    Jens right- the boiler will need a slightly longer flue- no biggie
  • Jen P
    It looks more complicated than that though. It looks like you couldn’t attach the boiler to the porch wall. So you’d need 90 degree turns in the flue to vent externally. And if you do vent through the porch, you’d have to hope the flue fits above the porch doors. A lot of potentially unnecessary work imo
  • Jonathan
    Jen- I think your gas safety training is incomplete because you are worrying about things that can easily be overcome- firstly boiler flues exit the boiler at the top and then turn- whether they turn to go through the wall behind the boiler or sideways through another wall makes no difference. Since we haven’t seen pictures we don’t know what the porch is like- it might be that the porch door is naff and coming out, or there is space above or to the side of the door, or there may be room in the space between floors for the flue or it may be able to go straight up and out of the main house roof. Regardless let’s not create problems that probably don’t exist.
  • PRO
    Shabby Bear Cottage
    Hi Jen, the boiler currently has a hazard warning *stay away you may die* sign on it. With new babies I would ideally like to get it done sooner rather than later though. The front porch is very bad, will need redoing completely so Im hopeful it can be overcome? :)
  • Jonathan
    Personally I think your plumbing and heating specialist will be able to fit a horizontal flue. However if it needs to go vertically that shouldn’t be a problem either as it will go against a wall upstairs and can be boxed in.
  • Jonathan
    This time with a better picture of the position of the flue if it has to go vertically through the bedroom above
  • PRO
    Shabby Bear Cottage
    Absolutely amazing, completely agree! I’m almost certain it can go out through the porch, but if not straight up also seems perfectly fine! :)
  • Jen P
    All problems can be overcome at a cost Jonathan. However you appear to be suggesting the poster moves a boiler, a doorway and installs a relatively complicated flue. What are your qualifications out of interest as you ask about mine ;) ? The poster may decide in 6 months that ideally they would have a different layout, but have already moved the boiler so have unnecessarily limited their options.
  • Jonathan
    Given the limited amount of information we all give the best advice possible from our own experience- I’m sorry Jen doesn’t agree.

    Given we don’t know the house sizes, budget, planning constraints we don’t know with certainty if anything suggested is possible. But if it were my house I would prefer the boiler to be in the utility than in the main entrance (but I concede budget may dictate otherwise).

    As far as this being a complicated flue some boilers can have horizontal flues of up to 8m long and an extension to the one supplied with the boiler is rarely more than £50 - given the stated aspiration of a loft conversion I felt it was safe to assume this £50 was in budget although Jen is right that moving the boiler may be an expense too far given the work you intend to take on. Equally if you intend reconfiguring the house your existing heating pipework may need to be relocated and moving the boiler may be easily done at the same time.

    Since this post is mainly to get inspiration for a new layout and I have done my best to give one possibility that delivers the stated aims I don’t feel any defense of my efforts is necessary.

    In my humble opinion the boiler conversation could pose a different discussion on a different thread as if your end goal is to have three bathrooms you may prefer to get a system boiler with a hot water storage cylinder to better deliver your hot water. In which case you need to put the cylinder somewhere- you could get rid of the side porch to make the proposed utility bigger in order to also accommodate the cylinder.
  • rinq

    Double post, I just commented here: https://www.houzz.com/discussions/old-bungalow-conversion-new-floor-plan-dsvw-vd~5675333#24063469 (thanks Jonathan for letting me know)

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