webuser_768402840

Do I take down the plaster and the ceilings as well? Bricks look faded

HU-768402840
4 days ago

Hi Everyone,


Hope all had a nice weekend. I'm back, asking for advise

As mentioned earlier, I wished to strip the whole house, before I refurbish and start with rewiring.

I understand that I would have to take the carpets out, then the wood cladding. Do I actually have to remove all the plaster, up to the bone so to speak? Is that with a chisel? Chip away till you hit the internal frame? What about the ceilings, do I strip them of all the plaster as well?


Also the bricks of the outer walls look jaded or faded. I read somewhere it can be brushed with a silicone water emulsion?

Please do advise

Kind Regards


Mel





Comments (12)

  • HU-768402840
    Original Author
    4 days ago

    Some more ceiling and wall plaster pics

    I don't think much work has been done on this house, as it still seems to be in the 1970

    I would feel much better, if at one go, all these things are taken down, re- plastered and then we start from scratch. Rather than replacing things bit by bit

    Some more pics of the bedroom and lounge





  • sarh123
    4 days ago

    It’s usually unnecessary to remove plasterwork even on a major refurb - our 1970s plaster ceilings are very badly cracked but we repair them as we do each room. Good quality lining paper can give a lovely finish to paint over rather than replastering. Also be careful with artexed ceilings/walls as they can contain a small amount of asbestos- I’ve seen different views on how best to deal with them but you need to check. We’ve always got builders/decorators to deal with them (and in one case had the material tested for asbestos before starting work).

    HU-768402840 thanked sarh123
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  • Sarah L
    3 days ago

    I agree with Sonia

    HU-768402840 thanked Sarah L
  • HU-768402840
    Original Author
    3 days ago

    Once again, many thanks to Sarh123 and Sonia

    As a newbie, now in the second month of refurbishment training, this is the first time I have come across the term

    -Good quality lining paper can give a lovely finish to paint over rather than re-plastering-

    So have done a search on the web, and cut and pasted some more information. Two reasons, one is for my own future reference and second to share information on this forum. As it has given me so much, hoping to give something back.

    Kind Regards


    Mel


    -------------

    Depends on the final finish you want. Are you putting up patterned paper or do you want smooth walls ?

    Unless the original walls are perfectly smooth imperfections will still show through the paper. It covers cracks to some extent but filling these first helps. Tiny bits of old wallpaper and specs of plaster show through the paper.

    Perhaps the professionals on this site know of REALLY thick lining paper that isn't sold to the public in B+Q or wickes.

    We've done an entire house and now the walls look brilliant but it has taken us months (working at weekends)

    We've had the worst walls re-plastered but then they needed at least 3 coats of emulsion. And the rest have been lined, papered then emulsioned.

    Previously to this house we did a Victorian house and where the plaster was sound it could be easily touched up and papered but loads of it was blown and needed replastering. So beware this when stripping off old paper. Go easy with the steamer.

    To replaster you will have to get the old stuff off first which is also time but the preparation for papering will also take time but probably nowhere near as much.

    I'd assume the worst if I saw thick anaglypta or woodchip again in a potential purchase and budget for the time and cost to get rid of the b l o o d y stuff

    Good Luck !

    --------------

    Stripping, lining and painting the walls will give a good quality finish if done well but it is not the same as plaster or comparable even...kind of a different thing, like comparing apples with oranges.

    I never give a definite quote for stripping wallpaper, only an estimate and woodchip esp, sometimes it comes off like a dream and other times it’s a beggar to get off, all depends how well it was put up. You may find other decorators going the same way.
    Since plastering can't be done till you've stripped the walls of paper it might be worth getting hold of a stripper and testing to see just how easy removal will be; it might help indicate how hefty a bill the labour will end up being for either of the two jobs.

    I love to see old lined walls I like their idiosyncrasies preserved. The walls do need to be prepared properly filled and and sanded smooth, and yes, you can get very heavy lining paper (but IMHO it looks horrible too heavy 1000 grade is enough for me, I also like 800) but even if you use 1200 grade or more (I see 1700 on the net) if you don't do the prep then faults will show through.

    I fancy trying out the non-woven lining paper...expensive but looks great. Any of you guys out there tried it yet?

    ------------------------------


    read this with interest. I am a complete novice decorator, and have a small Victorian cottage to decorate where the downstairs and stairwell are covered in thick light green embossed wallpaper. The paper is pretty sound and smooth, but the embossment isn't great; we'd prefer the smooth contemporary look.

    Friends and family and fiancée think I should just paint over it all. On the other hand, an interior designer friend describes the paper as 'bed-sit' like and thinks all the paper should come off and redecorated smooth.

    I've tried a few patches but the pattern is still obvious - none of the paints is thick enough to hide it. I'm a bit reluctant to buy a lot of expensive paint and spend a lot of time to do it all if it still looks **** afterwards. Also wonder if I paint over the existing paper now and then want to remove it in a couple of years if I will have made a rod for my own back??!!

    On the other hand, I expect that stripping it all off will reveal a lot of horrors - the walls look a bit 'lumpy' in places. Also not sure if will get away with lining or would have to replaster.

    Would have liked to be able to put lining paper or polycell smoothener directly over the existing paper and paint over that, but it sounds like that's not going to work??

    Am also interested in insulating the insides of the end walls if worthwhile if it’s going to be a big job anyway.

    I hope if anyone has any insight into the pros and cons of different approaches they could reply? I'd be very grateful for that. Also, roughly how long it might take a good decorator to do it properly.


    ---------------------------------------------------------------------

    I did a similar job on a couple of 5 bed Victorian houses. I opted for lining paper, and I wish I had skimmed everything. The old plaster was sound for the most part and lining paper has covered any blemishes, but no matter how good the job, peoples conceptions are still that lining paper is hiding something. The houses are on sale, but all of the agents have said that lining paper does not sell a house. I have skimmed over existing plaster before to produce a nice fininsh. That was a couple of years ago and there have been no problems so I am assuming there will not be - any plasterers out there have any comments?
    If the plaster cannot be skimmed over and needs to be redone then I would suggest hack it all off, dot and dab boards up which you can then skim.

    ---------------------------------------------


    Stripping, lining and painting the walls will give a good quality finish if done well but it is not the
    same as plaster or comparable even...kind of a different thing, like comparing apples with oranges.

    I never give a definite quote for stripping wallpaper, only an estimate and woodchip esp,
    sometimes it comes off like a dream and other times it’s a beggar to get off, all depends how well it was put up. You may find other decorators going the same way.


    Since plastering can't be done till you've stripped the walls of paper it might be worth getting hold of a stripper and testing to see just how easy removal will be; it might help indicate how hefty a bill the labour will end up being for either of the two jobs.

    I love to see old lined walls I like their idiosyncrasies preserved. The walls do need to be
    prepared properly filled and and sanded smooth, and yes, you can get very heavy lining paper (but IMHO it looks horrible too heavy 1000 grade is enough for me,
    I also like 800) but even if you use 1200 grade or more (I see 1700 on the net) if you don't do the prep then faults will show through.

    I fancy trying out the non-woven lining paper...expensive but looks great. Any of you guys
    out there tried it yet?

    Where did you see the 1700 grade lining paper on the net - I'm curious as they thickest i have seen is 1400?

    -----------------------------------------------------


    Plaster if you have the budget and the house is relatively empty, failing that strip off all existing gear and paper. Finish will of course depend on wall state etc. etc., strip and wash down, fill in any holes and rub back down, size with wallpaper paste and use a good grade of lining paper - when papering butt the joints and you should have no need for filler or velvet, if you do have a couple of horrible joints you can rub down fill as required - good luck

    ----------------------------


    From our own web site


    https://www.houzz.co.uk/discussions/3105105/lining-paper-or-not


    Lining paper or not?

    Hi there,
    We've had two decorators quote for painting a large space.

    The first one said that we would need the existing wallpaper stripped, the plaster filled where it needed, then paint applied directly. We asked him about lining paper and he said absolutely not - any painter who suggests lining paper should be shown the door.

    The second decorator said that we would need the existing wallpaper stripped, then lining paper hung, then paint on top. When we asked him whether the lining paper was necessary, he said definitely - any decorator who said it wasn't was wrong.

    Who should we go with? Both decorators have come highly recommended, but which one is correct. The room in question is a very large hallway with high ceilings in an old victorian house. The walls look sound but are probably the original plaster. It's going to be a big job so we do don't want to end up having to get it redone anytime soon. Any advice?

    Featured Answer

    6 years ago

    Lining paper is the easy way out. I tell this to all my clients - if you want it done quick, and it won't look that spectacular then get it lined but I won't do it for you, sorry. It's a cheap fix, an old fashioned way to ignore a problem rather than dealing with it properly.

    Strip the paper off, sand the walls, mist coat the walls, skim the walls with a light filler, sand the walls, mist cost the walls where the filler was again then start decorating from the top down: ceiling & coving, walls, then woodwork last.

    I would stick with the guy who said no to lining the paper bit I would also check to see if he was previous recommendations

    --------------------


    ----------------------------------------

    If there is lots of cracks on walls, celings, it's mean they will apper anytime in the future soon, this is becouse of the movement of the ground, if your house is on that position you proplably have cracks on walls and celings and lining paper is what you certainly need. Sometimes people skimm the walls and line them strait away. I would take wallpaper off see how walls looks like, and then decide. If the house is all papered i would certainly go with new lining paper and paint

    ------------------------.

    Would be good to know the age of your property? when we bought our period house 16 years ago, the rooms were in a terrible state. We plastered every single room and then our decorator applied thick lining paper and paint. We have decorated 2 times since and the it's an easy job to complete and the finish is lovely. I am not an expert but the lining paper seems to give the walls a lovely even finish.

    -----------------


    Lining Paper or Plaster?

    Lining paper or plaster? That is the question.A lot of customers do not know what to do when it comes to this. And I have to say, with all my years of experience. It is totally a preference.If you buy a house, and want to go to the extent of having it re-decorated professionally, your preferences should come first. One thing I have learned, is that interior decoration is a cyclic thing. Wallpaper comes in and out of fashion every few years, each time it seems it has more garish colours and patterns. But it is your house, and what you want goes.My personal recommendation would be to have nicely plastered walls. The reason for this is as follows. If your walls are in good condition, and any cracks or holes have been mended, skimming them is not necessarily going to be a long, arduous or expensive process. Plastered walls can be painted and re-painted time and time again, and will continue to stay in good condition.If your walls are already wallpapered and you want to have them stripped back, skimmed and painted, it is slightly more of a task, but again, it can be done. One thing that I will always advise you to think about is, you don’t know what condition the walls are in under the wallpaper, and any quotation would have to be re-evaluated is severe cases. This is where a lot of customers would opt for lining paper to be put on the walls.Lining paper comes in different thickness’s. A thick lining paper put on a wall well by a professional, any bumps or cracks underneath would not be noticeable. Once painted, you wouldn’t know that there was paper on the walls. This is the cheaper, faster alternative to having your walls mended, made good and skimmed.The down side to lined walls is, the first few times you choose to paint it looks great, after that, the weight of the paint on the paper begins to make it sag slightly. The seams start to separate, and then the central heating helps them to separate more, and warps it slightly. This is only ever so slightly, but enough that you would notice it one day.I would recommend to those with lined walls, to get the re-lined every 3 or 4 coats of paint, this way they always look fresh, and not like overly painted wallpaper.

  • sarh123
    3 days ago

    Sorry I wasn’t suggesting papering to disguise poor walls and cracks , rather to give a lovely finish to acceptable plaster. We had a fantastic decorator in our previous house and he always insisted on a heavy lining paper to get a perfect base for painting.

    HU-768402840 thanked sarh123
  • HU-768402840
    Original Author
    3 days ago

    Sarah 123,

    Please don't apologize, it's through sharing information, that I now understand a little about refurbishment. Many thanks for your reply

    Just imagine, till yesterday I didn't even know what lining paper was!!

  • Daisy England
    3 days ago

    As Sonia says just get them skimmed but do be aware that plasterers are hard to get at the moment as they are all so busy.

    I’m not a lover of lining paper. It’s so old fashioned I wouldn’t go down that route.

    HU-768402840 thanked Daisy England
  • Sonia
    3 days ago

    Do you know my stepson is a plasterer and the finish of his work is like an ice rink. You’d never achieve that finish with lining paper. 😊

    HU-768402840 thanked Sonia
  • Deborah
    yesterday

    When you talk of removing plaster, do you realise that in a modern house like yours the plaster is likely to be a skimming of plaster over plaster board so basically its impossible to just remove the plaster. To take this all back to basics, you need to understand what your house is constructed of - what makes up it’s layers, so to speak - and how its constructed. When you start to get quotes from trades, say an electrician, they will tell you what they want, such as cutting out channels for the trunking, wiring etc. Don’t start taking out everything in your house without taking some advice from a builder. Also remember any builder worth their salt will be busy and don’t pay anyone ANY money up front. they will invoice you for work they have completed.


    Don’t take the ceilings down or try to get the plaster off until you’ve spoken to a plasterer. Again, plasterers are hard to get hold of as there is so much housebuilding going on and belive me its not a job you can do yourself. (Unless you are a plasterer).


    Also, as you are a beginnner, you will have plenty to worry about other than the colour of the bricks! If the bricks of neighbouring houses look similar then possibly it’s weathering. As long as the pointing is good, don’t worry.


    Also bear in mind the shortage of materials and increasing costs when you are planning work.


    having said all that it is exciting and rewarding to do up one’s home. Good luck and enjoy!!

    HU-768402840 thanked Deborah
  • HU-768402840
    Original Author
    yesterday

    Thanks Deborah,

    I will note all the points down

    God bless you

  • annarocks123
    yesterday

    5 years ago I bought a house that needed fully replastering. I went and did a week long course. It cost £350, I then spent about that again on tools. To get your entire house replastered will cost significantly more than this, if you want to get some diy skills, this is a pretty good place to start as once you have the basic skills it's practise, practise, practise! Also, you can cancel your gym while you are plastering as it's a full body workout. I don't want you thinking that you'll be able to be a professional plasterer after a week, but after plastering most of my house, I'm not too shoddy, even my electrician is impressed with my skills!

    I can't not imagine any need to hack the plaster off the walls, if the electrician needs to make channels for new wires they will have a tool for that and this can be made good afterwards. You might want to look on YouTube for videos of running wires and making good to see what I mean. Personally I prefer a freshly plastered wall over a lined wall, whether I'm painting or wall papering, as it gives a really nice finish and if you're planning to stay in this house for more than one lot of decorating, it will make changing the decoration much easier next time.

    Good luck

    HU-768402840 thanked annarocks123
United Kingdom
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