Richmond, 1930's refurbishment contemporary-wardrobe
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Richmond, 1930's refurbishment Contemporary Wardrobe, London

URL
http://www.amorybrown.co.uk
This is an example of a contemporary wardrobe in London. — Houzz

What Houzz contributors are saying:

Victoria Harrison added this to Houzz Tour: Bringing Colour and Fun to a 1930s Home in Southwest London
A custom-designed dressing room connects the master bedroom with the en-suite bathroom. All the joinery was made bespoke for the owners. The mix of drawers and open units means clutter can be tidied away while favourite and frequently used items can be displayed to full advantage.
Jo Simmons added this to The Very Best Walk-in Wardrobes
Go for white and woodRather than the dark, moody feel that many windowless walk-ins have, this lovely wardrobe is a vision in white. Dark wood creates the storage structure and mirrored sides help to maximise the light, while crisp white shelves and drawers make the whole space feel open and the clothes easy to locate.
Cathy Rebecca added this to 10 Creative Walk-in Wardrobe Ideas
Combine with a bathroomA space between a bedroom and bathroom is often the ideal place for a walk-in wardrobe; very convenient for getting ready in the mornings. Here, wood works with white both to give a rustic twist to the contemporary design and to frame the wardrobe zone.
Cheryl Freedman added this to Lifestyle: New Year Ideas for Detoxing Your Home
Whittle down your wardrobeI admit in weaker moments, when my dresses are spilling out onto the floor, I dream of having a walk-in wardrobe. If you have the space to give up a portion of your existing bedroom, or an adjoining room you can convert, then this may be possible. If this isn’t an option, then follow the well-worn advice and do a wardrobe detox. If you haven’t worn something for over a year, charity shop it. If it no longer fits, charity shop it. If you’ve never actually worn it, charity shop it! Dust down and rearrange what’s left, and buy some nice wooden hangers. Finally, you’ll be able to close those closet doors, and your bedroom will look much nicer.
Kat Bern added this to Straightforward Strategies to Streamline Your Wardrobe
Ditch discomfortAnything, and I mean anything, that feels so uncomfortable that you only wear it when you have to must go. This is the most common reason we keep stuff – because there’s nothing wrong with it, except we don’t feel comfortable in it. And then the guilt kicks in. Here’s news for you: you deserve to feel comfortable all of the time. So if you bought something you now regret buying, accept the fact, ditch it and carry on. I can almost guarantee you won’t miss it. Next time you shop, pay extra attention to how comfortable something feels before you buy it. It’s worth sitting down, bending over and lifting your arms in the changing room to see how a certain piece would feel once you start moving in it.
Lara Watson added this to 10 Design Features Homeowners Typically Ask For
Master a walk-in wardrobeI don’t know many clients who don’t have this on their wish list! A walk-in wardrobe is really only going to be successful, though, if you can do just that, and move freely around the space, so this dream feature does need a bit of room. Do you have a boxroom you could convert? Or, if you can shift some walls about, then consider taking a slice off the bedroom, which really only needs to be big enough for a bed, and create room for your walk-in wardrobe, where you’ll really feel the benefit of that extra storage space.Choose a closed wardrobe if you’re untidy, like me, but if you’re organised and like to be able to see your clothes all at once, then open hanging is a great option and usually slightly cheaper, too. A mix of open hanging and wardrobe doors can work well, especially if you’re trying to break up the space. High-gloss finishes look great in smaller areas, as they bounce the light around the room and make it feel bigger and brighter. Lighting is paramount – you really need to be able to see your clothes, especially as dressing rooms tend to have little natural light.

What Houzzers are commenting on:

ddharley added this to Bathrooms
Go for white and wood. Rather than the dark, moody feel that many windowless walk-ins have, this lovely wardrobe is a vision in white. Dark wood creates the storage structure and mirrored sides help to maximize the light, while crisp white shelves and drawers make the whole space feel open and the clothes easy to locate.
lgvarner added this to closets
Like the white and wood together.
neatguy6908 added this to Master bedroom
walk-in closet near bath, wood frames

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