tommyflan

Live Chat: How to bring personality into your home, December 3rd 12pm

Tom Flanagan
5 years ago
last modified: 5 years ago

It's finally happened - you've got your own home, but now what next? You've got a vision of what you want it to look like, but how do you really make it your 'own'? We've all been there and sometimes, bringing your own personality and style into your home is easier said than done.

Luckily, we've asked somebody who knows just what it means to go through a renovation process and successfully stamp their personality onto their home, to join us and answer all your questions. Welcome Kimberly Duran of Swoon Worthy blog fame who's here to help you along the way! Whether it's colour choices, challenges faced or when to listen to your heart not your head, all questions are welcome.

Throughout this chat, we'll be asking her questions that have been posted beforehand but we encourage all Houzzers to ask away and take part in the discussion as it runs. This is how it will work: I will post questions as comments to the thread. Each question will have a question number, for example ‘Q1)”. When Kimberly is answering a question, she will use the corresponding label, for example ‘A1)’. Don’t forget to keep refreshing the page to see new questions and answers.

The Live Chat will start Thursday the 3rd at 12pm and will run for 30-45 minutes. Feel free to post your questions now and we'll answer them in the chat! See you then!

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Comments (66)

  • Tim Baker
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    I'm a first time buyer and I am just about to move in (hopefully next Friday!). My girl friend will be moving in soon after and understandably she wants a dressing table with good lighting for getting ready and make up etc. The room is a bit more man-ish than girly and all of the dressing tables are very feminine which I think will look really out of place (though having one is of course good, I just want it to look right). Do you have any tips to make it a "girls oasis" without being out of place in a more manly room and are there any specific dressing tables (/styles) that would work or spring to mind?

  • Gail
    5 years ago

    we have knocked the walls down and our living/dining room open - I want to decorate in the spring - what are the new seasons colours - warmer shades rather than cool.


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  • LG Bennett
    5 years ago

    I am decorating my hall on a tight budget in an Victorian house. I love the panelled look but it is proving quite costly for all the wood/mdf . Do you think it would work if I put strips of wooden architrave below the dado rail and then paint it to look like panelling? Or do you have any other budget options.

  • noura123abc
    5 years ago
    I love everything you post on this app ! But where can I find the pieces is it only for display what you post or there are shops where we can go and find the piece that we want?
  • Tom Flanagan
    Original Author
    5 years ago

    HI @noura123abc,

    So good to hear you're enjoying things, and feel free to leave a question for our blogger here too!

    Regarding purchasing items, please head to our 'Products' section or click on one of the green tags in a photo to view the product. Hope that helps!

  • pjcottle1
    5 years ago

    Our Edwardian fixer upper has a fireplace in every room - the original ones. But this really dictates where you can put the furniture etc as well as having to make room on another wall for a radiator. What are your views on best space use given that most of them won't be used especially in the bedrooms?


  • sharon_m_nolan01
    5 years ago
    We have just relocated to the UK and purchased our first home. It's a new build with a black slate roof, white render facade and stone accents. The interior is to be completely painted brilliant white - no choice in this finish. The agent has advised that the property will take two years to dry and settle so repainting in color is not advised. How can I inject warmth whilst keeping a modern minimalist theme in the flooring tiling and kitchen cabinetry. What colors or tones would you suggest?
  • joykellymoore
    5 years ago

    We are a retired couple wanting to revamp our sittingroom - dining room. We have a big family with children and grandchiildren who visit every Sunday. We divided the room into two separate spaces with a stud wall some years ago when we had teenage children and toddlers all living at home but the room is not functional now that we are on our own. Everyone crams into the kitchen on sundays and the other two rooms are not really used. SO THE BIG QUESTION IS DO WE TAKE DOWN THE WALL TO MAKE IT OPEN PLAN AND IF WE DO HOW CAN WE MAKE IT COSY FOR OURSELVES THE REST OF THE WEEK?

  • Elaine Hobson
    5 years ago

    I have a narrow hallway that runs north east to south west, front door to kitchen dining room. It has a radiator along one wall then the stair case and two doorways off to a toilet and store on the opposite wall. Until now it's been painted in a pale lilac to try and brighten it but I'm tempted by having one wall in teal! The kitchen has accents of duck egg but is predominantly beige. Any thoughts about how to blend the melange that is currently going on!

  • Petite Maison
    5 years ago

    Any ideas for our new lounge? You can see from the photos the furniture we have to work with. (The first and second pictures are of our old lounge and sofas in our old dining room. The third and fourth pictures are the new lounge with the previous owners furniture)




  • midcenturyreno
    5 years ago

    I have a renovated (new kitchen, bath, windows etc) mid-century house. My traditional antique furniture isn't looking "hip" with this style of house but I'd still like to incorporate mixing modern/contemporary and antique. How do I do this without making it look like Granny's cast offs? I'm getting a new sofa (Roche Bobois Profile and Porada infinity coffee table) that I think bridges the gap. How to keep the look current and uncluttered - what type of chairs, lamps, side tables, accessories?


  • Sue Reid
    5 years ago
    Hello, Thanks in advance if you're able to consider this question: I've recently moved into my erstwhile French Mediterranean holiday home and plan to live here permanently. I need to transform it from a small detached modern holiday let into my home. It faces and has sea views from the first floor. My downstairs living area of approx 6.3m x 5.2m, has white walls and combines kitchen, dining and soft seating, and has large patio doors onto a small private garden. The existing dominant colours are white, charcoal grey/black and natural wood with a light cream tiled floor. I'm about to change the soft furnishings. My question is what colours/accents might I introduce to give this room life and freshness. I have a black Labrador so dog hair has to enter the equation!
  • fna10
    5 years ago
    Hi! We are in the process of completely renovating our 4bed 1940s home. My question relates to doors, architraves and skirting. I'd love to move away from white gloss but is that a bad idea? Would I need to use the same colour throughout the house? If you get to this question - thanks in advance.
  • janicey7
    5 years ago

    We have inherited lots of dark oriental/Georgian furniture. I am about to put down new flooring, can you suggest something that will look light and contemporary against the dark furniture. Not carpet. Many thanks

  • Ludo Gallagher
    5 years ago

    I'm keen to make our medium sized bathroom feel more like a room and add some interesting features not necessary traditional to a bathroom. Or do something interesting like make it a dark or use unusual textures. Any ideas you have seen work would be fab.

  • Lynda Degg
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago


    We are about to decorate the lounge in our retirement apartment in Spain. Both of us want to have a chilled out feel and have already purchased a glass dining table and high gloss wall and base units (very pale green/coffee). We are struggling on the colour for the walls and fireplace and would appreciate your advice as to how to get the wow factor. The flooring is grey/white marble.

  • Gail
    5 years ago

    What are the new colours for spring 2016 for living/dining areas

  • Trisha Goodwin
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago



    We have bought a house in Scottish Highlands, ten years old and with all pine interior doors, staircase, window frames and skirting boards. They are beautifully waxed and warm looking, and local to area, so want to keep them. I have already fallen in love with a fabric and bought vast quantities of it at great price - as can make own curtains and blinds. Question is - not sure how to integrate the two! Photos are of house before purchase, but you can see the woodwork clearly. The floor is a very good rustic oak, again to keep, it sort of goes OK with the pine but has more grey/ashy tones in with the brown wood. The hearthstone is dark grey slate. I refuse to go the tartan and twee route and instead have gone for the heather tones in this quite designer mid century/Scandi fabric. Any ideas or suggestions (also from others online) would be much appreciated!

  • charlie_bill
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    where would you direct someone looking to capture industrial chic in a period home?

  • candijg
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Please help. Total refurb, in fact you can see what it was before on previous posts of mine. New Versailles parque floor just laid, stone fireplace with slate hearth and slips to be installed soon. Units to be painted similar colour as walls, floating sideboard on back wall opposite units with shelving above for books. Have kept everything very neutral to add warmth from fabrics etc. Need advice for dining table and chairs (4th pic shows dining space) and sofas. Really am an eclectic person so happy to mix and match but really lost as to what to choose for table. Glass, wood, no idea!!! Quite fancied a reclaimed wood table with velvet carvers and individual chairs but not sure it goes with all else. My heart says wood but head says keep it simple and elegant, (not reclaimed look) Any help would be so appreciated:) Thanks

  • Tom Flanagan
    Original Author
    5 years ago

    Hey everyone, thanks so much for the questions so far - there's plenty for us to get through! We'll do our best to answer as many as we can, but just a quick reminder that if we can gear all our questions towards the topic in mind, that would be great. Personality is everything after all - see you tomorrow!

  • Jacqueline McCarthy
    5 years ago

    Awe live a 200 year old large thatched cottage. Our main cosy living room has a fairly low ceiling which I would like to paint a pale grey. the walls are Brooklyn mist, colour trend which we love, we have recently put younger and groove half way up walls, which would also be pale grey, do you think this would be the best colour for a fairly dark room. thank you .

  • Tom Flanagan
    Original Author
    5 years ago

    Good morning everybody! We'll be kicking off the Live Chat in 30 minutes so tune in then, where Kimberly and I will be working our way through your questions - if you've got any last minute questions, get posting now!

  • Tom Flanagan
    Original Author
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Hi everyone and welcome to our Live Chat! We've got the lovely Kimberley Duran from Swoon Worthy blog who's going to be answering all your questions on how to add personality into the home. We'll be starting at 12pm sharp, so make sure you keep refreshing the page to see new questions!

  • Tom Flanagan
    Original Author
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Right let's get started!

    Kimberley, hope you're doing well today, great having you onboard! Your first question is from @2bsmaller:

    Q1) It's easy to be influenced by our parents' house or by the latest magazine trend, but really, where's the best place to start in figuring out how to put it altogether? How do you go about defining your style when you move into your first home?

  • Tom Flanagan
    Original Author
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Lovely Kimberly! I think looking for commonalities is key, and having Ideabooks and a visual really makes you learn to know what you love!

    Here's our next question from @deidre7:

    Q2) Deidre lives in a red brick Victorian house and needs to paint her solid wood front door! She’s wants it to be welcoming and smart and is thinking about a Teal colour - what do you think can give a door that 'wow factor'?

  • PRO
    Swoon Worthy Ltd.
    5 years ago

    A2) I absolutely adore older properties and live in one
    myself! I painted my front door in Farrow & Ball’s Hague Blue and it’s just
    the most gorgeous deep bluey-green – you may like that colour! It works
    wonderfully with the red bricks of my Edwardian home. If I hadn’t gone for that
    colour, a rich black, a dark slate grey or deep indigo blue always looks incredibly
    smart. Oh and don’t forget about your hardware! I love the look of brass hardware
    against dark colours – it’s just a stunning combination!

  • Tom Flanagan
    Original Author
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    I'm with you on that one Kimberley - blue and brass is such a standout combination!

    Question 3 is from Jane Berrow.

    Q3) From @JaneIreneBerrow - Jane and her husband totally have different tastes in decoration. Their new house is entirely magnolia and her husband loves it. She longs to add personality however but is hampered by the bland walls. What would be your starting point and did you ever face a challenge like this with your partner?

  • PRO
    Swoon Worthy Ltd.
    5 years ago

    A3) We've all been there with having to compromise ;) Don’t let your walls hold you back, though, Jane! If what hubby really wants is a more neutral palette, then I would recommend painting
    the walls with either white or a pale grey (Dulux Dusted Moss 2 is my go-to
    perfect light grey) to create a lovely, neutral backdrop and you can add your colour in other ways. However, if he really
    insists on keeping the magnolia, you can always energise the space by pulling
    in colour in other ways – through artwork, accessories and soft furnishings in
    warm tones to work along with it rather than fight the colour on the walls. For
    myself, well, my other half always has the final say and he’s ‘veto’d’ a few of
    my ideas (!) but for the most part, with gentle persuasion, he usually will
    either come around to it or I try to find a compromise we both love. There are so many choices out there, it's all about finding something you both can live with and be happy with.

  • Tom Flanagan
    Original Author
    5 years ago

    I'm sure there's a saying out there about compromise making a good marriage, but maybe I'm making that up...? Anyway, moving on!

    Question 4 is from @hazied who's stuck on the colour brown!

    Q4) What colour schemes could be used for soft furnishings and furniture that could match a brown/cream carpet?

  • PRO
    Swoon Worthy Ltd.
    5 years ago

    A4) Ultimately, creams and browns are neutrals so really, you should be
    fine to use just about any colour palette – that’s the beauty of neutrals, they
    really just fade into the background! If you are looking to change the carpet in
    the future once it’s in the budget, however, I would encourage you to go for
    furniture and accessories that you love rather than trying to work with
    something you won’t ultimately be keeping. In the meantime, consider layering a large rug
    in your preferred colour palette on top of the carpet – it’s perfectly okay to
    layer them by the way! – it'll distract from the carpet you don't love and you won’t feel quite as hemmed in
    with your choices. Check out Ikea or Urban Outfitters for large, incredibly
    well-priced rugs in all different colours and patterns.

  • Tom Flanagan
    Original Author
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    I hadn't thought about layering a rug, so I may try that myself! So true on the IKEA front, I'm in love with the monochrome Stockholm rug...

    Question 5 is from @milliotngnoma:

    Q5) Why is it important to listen to my heart instead of my head when it comes to the choosing of colour schemes?

  • PRO
    Swoon Worthy Ltd.
    5 years ago

    Oh the monochrome Stockholm rug is practically a classic ;) Agree with you there Tom!!

    A5) Oh I love this question! Okay, think of it a bit like your wardrobe – you will find
    yourself naturally drawn to certain colours probably because they work with
    your complexion or your hair or eyes and you just feel GOOD in those colours…
    it’s not much different with interiors. It’s fine to follow some strict rule
    book when decorating (admittedly, I'm all for a bit of rule-breaking personally) but if your heart isn’t reflected in the final design and if your personality isn't reflected, well, there’s no real
    soul in it. You won’t feel good in the space, it won’t feel like it’s really
    representing you as a person. You need to surround yourself with the things that
    make you feel like YOU. And that comes from listening to your heart, not just
    your head. It’s the only way to really bring that bit of yourself into your own
    space. I think it’s good for the soul to do that.

  • Tom Flanagan
    Original Author
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    So so true Kimberley! I think your home is a case in point that when you really do love your surroundings and feel like it reflects you, it's always going to come across well - and even when it doesn't, that's ok because at the end of the day you love it!

    Homes can bring out the sentimental side in of all of haha! Right, our next question is from Tim:

    Q6) Do you have any tips to make a dresser a "girls oasis" without being out of place in a more manly room and are there any specific dressing tables that you like and would recommend?

  • PRO
    Swoon Worthy Ltd.
    5 years ago

    A6) Congrats on your new home Tim! Very exciting! The easiest way
    to mix masculine and feminine design styles is to keep your larger pieces
    masculine – this means more straight lines and hard edges naturally and then
    adding feminine (softer/curvier/more ornate) finishing touches in the
    accessories. I would recommend not specifically searching for a ‘dressing
    table’. Essentially, what you are looking for is a small desk! Check out West
    Elm’s Lacquer Storage Mini Desk or perhaps their Modern Desk which has a more
    mid-century look depending upon the style of your other furniture. These sorts
    of styles work equally well in both masculine and feminine spaces. I’d avoid
    anything with too many curves and go for something very straight and simple and
    then add more feminine flourishes to it – perhaps a curvy lamp or an elegant
    light fixture or a large vintage mirror or even a soft Mongolian rug underneath it. I would also encourage you to add a
    few more feminine touches to the rest of the room as well to balance everything
    out.

  • Tom Flanagan
    Original Author
    5 years ago

    Tim - i hope that helps!


    Q7) From @ElaineHobson - “I have a narrow hallway and until now it's been painted in a pale lilac to try and brighten it but I'm tempted by having one wall in teal! The kitchen has accents of duck egg but is predominantly beige. Any thoughts about injecting personality into hallways, and how to be brave when it comes to getting over beige?”

  • PRO
    Swoon Worthy Ltd.
    5 years ago

    A7) I love that you’re feeling a bit brave and want to
    inject some colour, Elaine! I would avoid too many different colours in a smaller space
    like a hallway, however – it’ll end up breaking up what’s already a limited size and
    making it look choppy so I would either leave it in the pale lilac or just go
    crazy and do the whole thing in teal! What you could also consider if you want
    it to be bright and light but still have fun with colour is painting the walls
    in white and then painting just the ceiling a bright pop of colour. It’s
    totally unexpected but a really fun way of bringing a bit of colour into a
    space. An interior designer friend of mine has a tiny white hallway in her home but painted the ceiling in
    bright pink and it looked fantastic!

  • Tom Flanagan
    Original Author
    5 years ago

    Always be brave I'd say - thanks Kimberley, hallways are always so tough!

    Right we're into our last few questions! Question 8 is from two users, @SueReid and @LyndaDegg:

    Q8) Both are looking to freshen up their holiday homes and are looking for something calm and refreshing, but still give the wow factor - what would be your starting point and do you have any thoughts?

  • PRO
    Swoon Worthy Ltd.
    5 years ago

    A8) Warm metals are a huge trend this year and I believe that gold and
    brass are going to overtake copper as the ‘metal of the moment’ next year. You
    can have a totally calm and neutral space but consider adding a few touches of
    gold and brass, it adds a little bit of sparkle and warmth and will bounce
    light around a room – it definitely gives a room the wow factor. Try to avoid
    the really polished brass that was big in the 90’s and go for softer, brushed
    gold finishes. And don't be afraid to play with scale a little - I love an oversized mirror or a large light fixture in a room. They can really up the 'wow factor' in a space and make all the difference.

  • Tom Flanagan
    Original Author
    5 years ago

    I think we're with you on that prediction, I feel like brass is everywhere at the moment!

    Our penultimate question!

    Q9) @kcincam loves tiles and wants to express this in her home - have you got any ideas which colours, designs or styles would achieve a timeless look using tiles?

  • PRO
    Swoon Worthy Ltd.
    5 years ago

    A9) You can really never go wrong with the classic Metro
    tile – it’s been in style for nearly 100 years and works with pretty much any
    style at all. You can stick with white or choose from a myriad of different colours. If you are feeling a little braver, encaustic and cement
    patterned tiles are a beautiful trend and can bring so much interest into a
    space. If you are afraid of falling out of love with something really bold,
    then stick to tiles with patterns in neutral tones of black and white or grey.
    We used a beautiful Victorian-inspired pattern from Fired Earth in our bathroom
    a few years ago and while it’s bold in black and white, I still absolutely love
    it. Check out their Patisserie range, it's the one I used and I still get so many compliments on it - it's just a gorgeous range of tiles.

  • Tom Flanagan
    Original Author
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Even if Metro tiles someday go out of style, I still think I'll love them!

    Right, one last question for you Kimberley from @MaxineMcKenzie:

    Q10) I love a wide variety of styles, from Moroccan chic to industrial polished concrete to mid century modern. I don't want to have to stick slavishly to one style. How can I incorporate a bit of everything I love and make it all work together? Do you mistmatch styles in your own home and can it work?

  • PRO
    Swoon Worthy Ltd.
    5 years ago

    They'll never go out of style Tom - NEVER!! Haha!


    A10) Ohhh I love eclectic style, Maxine, and yes, I mix styles all the time in
    my own home! I will say, for as easy as it sounds to just throw everything you
    love into a space, it’s actually one of the hardest looks to do really well –
    that’s not to discourage you of course because when it all comes together, it’s
    incredibly satisfying! While it may be tempting to just include everything you
    like from all different styles together in one space, the resulting feeling
    will be one of over-stimulation and confusion. So the secret of this
    seamless integration requires creativity and some self-imposed
    boundaries.

    Sticking with a structured colour palette will give the room
    cohesiveness without making the room flat and uninteresting. Start with a
    neutral base for your larger pieces, your paint colours and/or your flooring as
    a means of grounding the space. Pay attention to how pieces relate to one
    another and how they relate to the room as a whole. One oversized piece
    is absolutely fine but 3 or 4 will make the room look cluttered and
    uncomfortable. Despite using mid-century hoop chairs alongside a more
    traditional chesterfield in my own living room, the backs of the chairs are of
    similar height to the low-lying sofa back. There is continuity of the
    eyeline and nothing jars too dramatically. You also want to ensure that when
    borrowing from different eras, you mix and match throughout the space – having
    a mid-century console table with art of the same era hanging above it and then
    a Victorian style fireplace with an ornate mirror in a different part of the
    room is going to look ‘off’. Take that artwork and hang it above the
    fireplace instead and perhaps use the more ornate mirror above the console
    table instead! Hope that helps!

  • Tom Flanagan
    Original Author
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    I hope they don't and yes to mixing and matching!

    Well I think that's a wrap! There's been some great questions and all fantastic answers from Kimberley. Hopefully this has all helped and given you a bit of confidence to be brave with your home decisions. [Kimberley's home[(https://www.houzz.co.uk/magazine/houzz-tour-at-home-with-kimberly-duran-of-swoon-worthy-stsetivw-vs~47775217) is a great example of all what she's said today so make sure you have a peek!

    For everyone who's questions we didn't get to, look out for our next one or post in Advice and our Community can help you out too!

    A big thank you to Kimberley once more and I'll see you all next time!

  • PRO
    Swoon Worthy Ltd.
    5 years ago

    Thank you so much everyone for all your fabulous questions - so sorry we couldn't get to everyone! Thanks so much Tom and the Houzz team for having me, it's been a pleasure hanging out with you today ;) x

  • Lynda Degg
    5 years ago

    Thank you so much for the suggestion of gold and brass for our mediterranean home. We have two large gold mirrors in our home in England so repeating this style would make the apartment feel more like home. I also love the suggestion of painting a ceiling in the hall in a dramatic colour. We also have a small hall to decorate and do not want to paint the walls too dark so bringing the colour into the ceiling could add to the moroccan feel and compliment the floor lanterns. Many many thanks for your suggestions.

  • PRO
    Swoon Worthy Ltd.
    5 years ago

    So pleased you enjoyed the chat Lynda! I adore Moroccan style too ;)

  • Maxine McKenzie
    5 years ago

    Great advice, thanks Kimberley!

  • Emmeline Westin
    5 years ago

    Thanks so much Kimberly, really useful advice!

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