richtraff

Shower over freestanding bath, without a curtain. Is my plan logical?!

Richard Trafford
8 years ago
I'm designing the renovation of my first home. I have most things settled in my mind except the bathroom.

It's small. 7' x 7' and I want a bath, shower, toilet and sink in there. Plus I want it to look awesome.

Couple more things. I want a free standing bath and I hate shower curtains with a passion.

My plan is to have a freestanding bath against one wall with a rain shower above it in the centre. Then use no curtain, but instead have a tiled wet room floor.

Picture a wet room but the shower is still over the tub.

Against the other wall will be my toilet and sink.

Is it also mad to consider having the tub/shower against the window?

Don't think about the current layout or plumbing. It's all getting ripped out. Re-plumbing and wiring the entire house.

Please tell me if I'm just being crazy!

Comments (48)

  • PRO
    Essentia Interior Design
    8 years ago
    might be a bit crazy! love your ideas BUT It will be very difficult to clean the floor with water bouncing off everything Its not good to have wet floors wall etc all of the time it needs to dry out a bit and I really dont know how you will wash the floors under and at the back of the bath, and having the window and frame wet all of the time is a worry! Difficult one cant think how you could use a glass screen in. because even if you glassed in the bath area, it will not be easy to clean under and around the bath!
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  • Richard Trafford
    Original Author
    8 years ago
    Thanks for the prompt responses! I've actually started the thread again but with pictures, so this could get confusing.

    I already think the idea of the tub/shower in front of the window is already an over complicated idea, especially considering the other factors.

    My plan would be to have a floor drain in the centre of the room; near the bath; or under the bath (if it has claw feet, haven't decided yet).

    So we can agree it'd definitely need a drain for splash water? Only reason I ask is because I think I saw this idea in a hotel bathroom with a floor drain and it worked ok. I was only there for one night so who knows the long term issues they may have with the system.

    I was thinking of having the bath, as mentioned, around 4-6 inches away from the wall. Tiles running up the wall behind the bathtub, with all the taps etc wall mounted.

    Just had a thought. Is it possible to install a bath with a flexible drain, so I could move it 6 - 12 inches for cleaning purposes?
  • S. Thomas Kutch
    8 years ago
    Not sure you could get that through code issues, but if you come up with a flexible connection that would remain water tight and still allow you to say pivot the tub, you might present it to the code officials for their blessings..........the worst they can say is No!. I would be skeptical if any plumbing contractor will provide a warranty for that connection. My biggest concern would be that moving the tub (pretty heavy) you might damage the tile installation and that repeated moving would have a cumulative degrading effect on you drain line connection.
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  • printesa
    8 years ago
    Some ideas as well. As for drain, yes you need one. In Europe, this is pretty much the norm..,having an open shower and no curtain. There is a drain in the middle of the room. If you like it, then it's fine. I'm always annoyed when I go visit there and have to dry the floors..I know the water drains, but I just don't like the idea of having water standing on the floor for too long.
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  • Richard Trafford
    Original Author
    8 years ago
    Some great ideas posted. Thanks.

    I'm located in the UK. I have no idea about any drainage regulations so I'd have to look into that. Thanks for pointed it out though.

    The trouble with my idea is, compared to others I see, is my bathroom is so small that the toilet and sink will basically be in the 'wet-zone'. Most others seem to have a toilet and sink on the other side of a screen.

    Something I could do with knowing is how far I should expect the water to splash. Will my toilet and sink end up getting soaked too? Bear in mind, most the water will be going down the tub.

    I guess I really need to try someone's shower/bath without the curtain pulled across!
  • PRO
    Essentia Interior Design
    8 years ago
    Well I have a shower bath with a bifold door that goes half way accross the bath and I can tell you the water still manages to get all over the floor!!! especially from those taller larger bodies! It even hits the ceiling!!!
  • PRO
    BLDG Workshop
    8 years ago
    I used to live in South America where this wetroom bathrooms were the norm. They typically didn't even have sloping floors, just a tall squeejee to quickly clean up afterwards. I really liked it, somehow it felt free or something, like I wasn't confined to a stall.
  • Judy M
    8 years ago
    It seems like with your plan, you would be climbing out of the tub while you and possibly the floor is wet, seems tricky to me.
    In most of the photos show, the tub and shower (while still in same enclosed space) are separate.
  • PRO
    Catherine Belan
    8 years ago
    Just curious - why do you want the tub, since you're going to be showering?
    You'll need to look into some commercial tile solutions that offer traction while the floor tile is wet.
    I too have lived with this set-up; plan on the water getting everywhere.
    And you'll need an awesome exhaust fan.
  • Richard Trafford
    Original Author
    8 years ago
    I'd like a bath for:

    - Bathing my niece/nephew...my own kids if i have any :-/
    - For the very rare occasion I feel like a bath
    - Resale

    The importance of those points are in order.

    I've always liked wetrooms whenever I've used them. But the trouble is: I've never actually lived with a wetroom. Perhaps it'd become tiresome?
    And it wouldn't have the freedom of wetroom because I'd still be limited to standing in the bath :-/

    Really unsure. Should I just have the balls to do something a bit different? Or should I assume there's good a reason bathrooms are designed the way they are?!
  • PRO
    Essentia Interior Design
    8 years ago
    Yes difficult decision maybe a bit more research! then possibly you will have to give in to sensability!
  • Richard Trafford
    Original Author
    8 years ago
    Damn sensibility. If only I could ask someone who's done exactly the same thing.

    Here's some pictures too; just so people know what I'm working with:
  • Richard Trafford
    Original Author
    8 years ago
    Ok, clearly this discussion board doesn't like iPhone sweep panoramic photos. Never mind , ignore those.
  • PRO
    Essentia Interior Design
    8 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago
    Sorry! will keep looking! there must be a way!!!
  • PRO
    OnePlan
    8 years ago
    Has someone already posted this idea book ?! I hope not - but I must admit to not reading all the thread - sorry !!! I will read it all when I have a bit more time ! Anyway - hope this helps !!!
    http://houzz.com/ideabooks/3149263
    :-)
  • PRO
    OnePlan
    8 years ago
    (I'm on my iPad and it doesn't automatically open all the links !)
    For ease of cleaning - consider a bath shower mixer with a long lead for the shower - as if just the waterfall and bath taps you will very wet when cleaning !!
  • PRO
    Essentia Interior Design
    8 years ago
    found these they may be interesting!
  • PRO
    Essentia Interior Design
    8 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago
    Although they are not directly beneath the shower head they would still get as wet and they are both stand alone baths! Just realised printesa has already posted one of these!
  • PRO
    Catherine Belan
    8 years ago
    Like essentia's photos. The other thing to check out: having only the rainhead for showering - how tall are your ceilings? Are you going to have enough pressure to shower well? Do you have access to a plumbing showroom? People who sell this everyday are going to be able to think thru it with you.
  • Judy M
    8 years ago
    I believe this is what poster wants, but without a shower curtain water will get everywhere.
    With this setup, a curtain seems to be a necessity.
    http://houzz.com/photos/32471
  • Judy M
    8 years ago
    This one seems to be very well done even though a curtain is involved, they have hung it from ceiling. Very attractive

    http://houzz.com/photos/2456534
  • Judy M
    8 years ago
    Best compromise, a tub shower combo with half frameless glass door.
    http://houzz.com/photos/1172548
  • Richard Trafford
    Original Author
    8 years ago
    Judy: you are absolutely right. That is what I want (only I'd make it look better).
    I would have 2 types of shower head. 1 on a hose and 1 rain type.

    But I think you're right. It's likely to be highly impractical, time consuming and expensive.

    I think the best option is probably **cringe** go with a good looking shower curtain and pole. Maybe a glass panel. Trouble with a glass panel is you can't tuck it out the way like a curtain.

    Can anyone perhaps convince me I should stick to my original plan. In the words of my idle Steve Jobs should i 'think different' ?
  • Judy M
    8 years ago
    For bathing children the glass panel can be hinged. Even if you don't have room to swing the door outward into the room you could swing it in (as long as it's not wider than the tub or it would hit wall) and that gives more room for accessibility to bathe children.
  • Judy M
    8 years ago
    If you look at half glass panel in photo it has hinges, it is not a fixed panel.
  • Richard Trafford
    Original Author
    8 years ago
    Thanks John, but my idea is basically to have everything in the shower. Bathtub, toilet and sink. In a 7' x 7' area, it wouldn't be big enough to fit a screen to separate things like in many 'bathtub in shower' examples.
    I just wonder whether the splashes from the shower would get stuff wet across the room that size?
  • PRO
    OnePlan
    8 years ago
    Why not try it - with a garden hose in the garden - see how far you splash - might be an idea to keep your clothes on ! Don't want to shock the neighbours !! Lol !!
  • PRO
    OnePlan
    8 years ago
    NB . In India they have the showers built into the room like this - I know it's possibly a hotter climate than you may be in - so the tiles won't dry as quickly for you - That would be my main concern - that you or a visitor might slip on the wet floor ... Can you not squeeze a shower into a bedroom or hallway somewhere ?! Or have a hot tub outside instead of a bath ?
  • Judy M
    8 years ago
    Do you currently have a tub shower combo with a curtain?

    If yes, take curtain down and take a normal shower using soap and shampoo, see how much water gets out of tub and there's the answer.
  • Richard Trafford
    Original Author
    8 years ago
    One Plan: great idea of trying it out in the garden. I could measure the splash area on the patio flags.

    However your second post is crazy. I thought I was being ambitious with my original plan - but a shower in the hallway?! You crazy. Still I like your attitude. #thinkdifferent
  • PRO
    Catherine Belan
    8 years ago
    Richtraff....lets break this down:
    1) you know you want a tub, toilet and sink
    2) you know you want a rainhead and wall mount shower head
    3) you know you want the room to function as a freestanding shower space

    So build those items, assume all the walls and flooring will have substrate waterproofing that withstands being showered on daily. No cabinet at sink or elsewhere in case they get splashed on. Floor drain for easy cleanup of shower water. Light fixtures to be dampproof and waterproof depending on location. Take the wood trim off the window and return to the window with tile. Paint with marine grade products to preserve window as much as possible. Decide between freestanding tub and a deck mounted, oversized tub that takes up the seven feet. (Frankly, I suggest you go that route, it will help create a sense of space when showering, catch more water, and be nicer when soaking, small pool for kiddos).



    Live with this for a while.

    In reality, you don't have to make a decision about either a glass, hinged panel or a curtain during construction. Both solutions can be added at a later date.

    You can decide if you have room to add glass panel. Also you can consider the "room dividing" shower curtain, so you don't have to touch it. Also consider - there are new and improved materials so you aren't stuck with a big ol' piece of plastic, there are solutions that are fabric.

    You mentioned making tub 4-6" off wall, have you found plumbing fixtures that can work with this? I would forego the idea of flexible drain and moveable tub even if you do use a footed tub, commercial details required to achieve that - check with local building regs.
  • PRO
    OnePlan
    8 years ago
    Well I was assuming you could make a mini showroom rather than just plonk a shower in the hall !! Now that would be Amusing!!!
  • PRO
    Catherine Belan
    8 years ago
    BTW: looked over your floor plan from other post....not sure you can line up toilet and sink on wall opposite tub combo and still have room for door to swing in. You may need to change to out swinging door.
  • Richard Trafford
    Original Author
    8 years ago
    It'll fit. The drawing was from the estate agent and isn't to scale.

    Thanks for looking.
  • sunnydrew
    8 years ago
    I lived in Asia and in some homes, especially for the live-in help, the norm was a bathroom that was all tiled and the shower /head was not "enclosed" anywhere. It was very strange to see no separation at all. You could literally use the toilet and shower at the same time. There was the single drain in the middle or to one side. I think that is too weird for the average person in terms of re-sale. But you could come up with a brand new design as well as make it what you want. You could do a very small but deep soaking tub. ( Japanese style, next to the shower) It is interesting all these new ideas to have the tub within the shower enclosure, but I think if you are going to opt for that, why not just go back the old style of a tub with the shower over it. You can enclose with a nice glass door like shown above in the thread, or use a curtain on a rounded rod. You can also hang curtains from the ceiling on a track that disappears above and then pull to one side; it is less obtrusive that way. I would consult with your building codes experts, and a professional bath designer to come up with a good plan. be sure to post photos when you are done.
  • PRO
    Hudson Street Design
    8 years ago
    Free standing tub tend to be too tall to climb into for a shower. Beware! Love the look of installing the tub freestanding, in the shower enclosure!
    I can't wait to design one!
  • gtwave
    8 years ago
    We are remodelling our bathroom and are in a similar situation. The room is about 9 x 5.5 ft.

    From experience I can tell you the type of free standing bath on claw feet you describe is a dirt trap. Especially when it is positioned against a wall. Dust collects under it and the wall behind collects layers of dirt and grime and is impossible to reach to clean. I would only have a bath like this again if it was free standing in the centre of a large bathroom.

    You mentioned a flexible drain pipe so you could move the bath for cleaning. You can get a flexible hose although it is intended for plumbing in awkward places. We have one under our sink and again from experience I wouldn't use one. It was only connected 18 months ago and when I disconnected it last weekend to remove some cotton buds that were blocking the drain (thanks kids!) it split. They are very cheap thin concertinaed plastic so split very easily.

    Moving the bath would also put pressure on pipe joints connecting the taps unless you fitted the taps to the wall.

    You can get folding glass shower screens and some of them look quite stylish. A fitted bath like the one in Judys photo with a folding screen could look fantastic.

    Good luck.
  • PRO
    Stella Michael
    6 years ago
    Does it need to be a freestanding bath? My bathroom is a similar size to yours (7.5 x 6.5 ft) and I had a similar dilemma ... I wanted a separate shower and not keen on them over the bath but thankfully came across and fell in love with the Duravit Paiova bath (page down for sizes http://www.duravit.co.uk/website/homepage/products/product_overview/series/paiova.com-en.html) which is full length, double sized on one side and normal at the other. I didn't intend to not have a shower screen but couldn't find anything non-intrusive so thought I would finish the bathroom and then see how it looked.

    Once finished, because the shower is at the wide part of the bath there is minimal splashing and the floor stays dry (I've never had to mop after a shower). I have learnt that having a hand towel over the edge of the bath while showering it catches any splashing, I just leave it there and put a fresh one out once a week or so. Also I have a thick but washable bathmat again it catches the odd splash.

    Overall I love the bathroom, both using and looking at it ... the bath is wonderful ... I rarely use it as a bath but when I do I feel like Cleopatra and even better it easily fits 2 people and/or numerous kids and contains all the splashing they do as it's more like a small pool than a bath due to the straight sides. I love it - beautiful and practical - tick!

    PS. In the old design my shower head was originally on the other side near the window but was causing the window to rot so avoid it if you can.

    PPS. Re photos - the red one is my bathroom the others are Duravit stock photos
  • standroid
    6 years ago
    It is not possible to shower over a freestanding bath. Unless it's hand held.Sorry.
  • Isobel Boyes
    6 years ago

    I have a non freestanding bath with a rain shower thingy over and no shower curtain. It splashes a bit but not a huge amount - having said that, I'm rather careful when showering. I too would like a freestanding bath with wall mounted taps/filler and no shower curtain or screen as I literally haven't seen a single design that doesn't look highly unappealing. I did wonder about a roller shower screen such as this so might look into this option. I had also thought that the 'make the rest of the room a wet room' idea sounded like an option - I think you'd need a really good extractor fan to help clear things up and definitely choose the type of tiles that are non-slip. There's these options: http://www.victorianplumbing.co.uk/kleine-wolke-vinyl-white-stripe-shower-roller-blind-w1340-x-h2400mm-parts-a-b-.aspx?campaign=googlebase&gclid=CjwKEAjwp56wBRDThOSZ3vqGzmESJABjNaj9EbbW10M8H7_xBGQxb2l6N9Q4Pkn-PwHMjSyMF4HJFhoCWgXw_wcB, http://www.bathblind.co.uk/. I still think these don't look very nice either! So I'm wondering if as standroid says, just having a handheld option would be the answer, rather than a rainfall head?

  • bridgendrd
    6 years ago
    I'd love to see some after pics of your home as we are taking on a similar project at the moment
  • PRO
    Serenity Bathrooms
    6 years ago

    Free standing baths are only suitable for larger rooms where you have the ability to position the bath with free access all the way round, I regularly remove them from smaller bathrooms when doing re-fits, people like the aesthetics of the free standing bath and plough ahead and install them against a wall, the result is a disgusting accumulation of dust, fluff, pubic hair etc, this will happen quite quickly and you will regret having gone down this route. The concept of having the bath with no curtain is interesting though, in a bathroom around 2.1m square, most of the bathroom will be effected by splashing, the room will need a wet room floor former, and will require that the whole room is tanked prior to tiling, have a look at. (http://www.wetroominnovations.com) I usually use their Maxus formers and Purus gully traps. you can indeed get a flexible waste connection, have a look at McAlpine "Flexcon" range, these are available through any reputable merchants, these are quite substantial and would stand up to semi regular movement, if your free standing bath is an acrylic bath it won't be too heavy, so moving it would be quite straight forward, but I would suggest having small felt pads on the feet to protect the tiled surface, also from a drying point of view, Karcher have a very good little gadget for cleaning windows, which vacuums up the water, I often mention it to clients and any who have bought one have been delighted at how easy it is to use, it will leave the floor almost dry once you have used it, one note of caution would be your choice of floor tile, you will need a porcelain tile that has an R rating, this is a slip resistant rating and would be most advised. another note of caution, because the splashing will not be controlled, any vanity or wood based furniture will deteriorate. I hope this is of some help.

  • PRO
    Serenity Bathrooms
    6 years ago

    We like to think different.

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