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Entrance Ideas and Designs

The entrance of your home is a critical area to design well because as we all know, first impressions count. As the first thing that visitors will see when they arrive, your entrance is your opportunity to offer guests a warm welcome while introducing the personality of your home. Equally important, it welcomes you home every day, so make it somewhere that you’re glad to come home to. The entrance to your home begins the moment you get to the front door, so make sure both inside and out get the attention of your decorator’s touch. Make your foyer the best possible introduction to the rest of the house, and if you wish, you can have a bit of fun with the doorway; paint, tiles, door handles and lighting are all ways to make front doors a statement – a dramatic entrance, if you will.

What front doors can I choose from?


Your first decision when updating front doors is what type of external doors you want to use, taking into account style, security and accessibility. Investing in a high quality front door is always worthwhile – this is a purchase where a little extra money goes a long way. Hardwood exterior doors remain the most popular choice of front door; as well as being the most economical, timber also opens the door to an endless selection of paint, hardware and embellishment. However, natural wood doors do have their downsides – prone to warping, they require more upkeep and may require replacing if not adequately cared for. Whether you opt for solid oak external doors or an oak veneer option, wooden doors are a match made in heaven for period architecture – it’s hard to imagine a Georgian house without a solid, six-panel door, or a Victorian home sans its gleaming hardware and stained glass panes. If you prefer non-wooden exterior doors, the alternatives are UPVC doors, GRP doors (collectively known as composite doors) and steel doors. UPVC front doors are often the most inexpensive alternative to timber and offer added insulation benefits; because the material itself can be a comparatively insubstantial, UPVC external doors are built into steel door frames for added reinforcement. GRP (glass-reinforced plastic, or fibreglass to you and me) doors offer the same properties, with a woodgrain effect that can provide a happy medium for lovers of timber. Steel doors are less widely used in the UK than the US, and make great contemporary front doors thanks to their sleek, modern appearance.

How do I decorate my doorway?


Renovating or replacing your front doors is one of the quickest ways to give your home a makeover, and affords the perfect opportunity to add a splash of colour to the front of your home. To improve your front door’s kerb appeal you can flank the doorway with decorative trees or flowering plants in attractive planters and “dress” the door with shiny hardware. Door knockers and door knobs can be more than functional with a range of styles and materials available to add some personality to exterior doors. A traditional brass door knocker can be the perfect complement to a solid oak doorway painted in a rich shade of green or blue, whilst contemporary chrome door hardware will look perfect against a white or eggshell door. If you are looking for an elegant front door option, opt for a hardwood door with built in obscured glass panels to let light into your hallway. If you would rather avoid a glass paned front door for security reasons then smaller decorative glass panels can also be inserted into the surround or door frame. You can choose stained glass panes for decorative effect, patterned or textured glass will allow light in but protect your privacy or get your home name or number etched into a glass pane for a practical but personal touch.

How should I light my front entrance?


The warm glow from a doorway is one of the most welcoming sights that can greet us when we arrive home. An entrance light is of practical importance – we have all spent time fumbling for our house keys in the dark – but it also offers an opportunity to add warmth and character to front doors and entrances. A wall mounted lantern is a charming traditional choice, or for bright, directed illumination opt for a security spotlight. There are a whole variety of switching options available – you can choose a motion sensor light that switches on right when you need it most, a timer light that will offer illumination on a fixed schedule or a switched outdoor light. Pointing light upward is a good way to avoid harsh glare, or choose recessed lighting if you prefer not to have a hanging light in front of your external doors. An entrance is also a great place to display lighting as a decorative feature – choose a table lamp that echoes the lines and colours of the hall beyond it.

What furniture and storage do I need in my entryway?


It’s important to keep the entrance to your home as open and clutter free as possible, so selecting a few practical items that will help with storage and offer a warm welcome is the best approach for this area. Coat stands, umbrella holders and shoe racks are practical foyer additions that will keep the area tidy. For the knick knacks and paraphernalia that so often accumulate by front doors, sideboards or console tables are helpful and opting for a something with a drawer is a clever trick to ensure these things can be stowed out of sight. If you have the space, an armchair, occasional chair or hallway bench will prove useful for perching on when removing shoes and definitely consider multi-functional furniture such as a storage bench for shoes. A wall mounted shoe cabinet is a must have for a tighter space, getting shoes off the floor and neatly stowed away.

How do I decorate my foyer?


Particularly in the entrance to the home, colour can be a wonderful tool to set the tone of the house. Neutral palettes can create a serene atmosphere appropriate for greeting guests; alternatively, you might find yourself being a little bit more adventurous by choosing a whimsical wallpaper or a bold wall colour that could look overwhelming anywhere else in the house. In either case, the foyer can be blended seamlessly into the home with details that connect it to adjoining rooms. Even if your entrance is not self-contained, instead with exterior doors that open straight into the house, visual tricks make it possible to create the illusion of an entryway by defining the space as such. Changes in flooring, a well-placed rug, a screen or curtain, or even furniture such as a console table or coat rack, can be used to delineate the space and distinguish the entrance from the rest of the hallway. Decorating walls and furniture with photographs or artwork is a simple way of bringing your personality into the foyer and plants, lamps, candles, vases and ornaments can be displayed on windowsills, tables or shelves. As a final thoughtful touch, mirrors placed next to front doors are a practical choice for those last minute appearance checks, as long as it’s not directly opposite the doorway, which could back-light the user – decidedly not helpful!
Contemporary front door in Sussex with medium hardwood flooring, a single front door, a white front door and grey floors.

Neil Macaninch
Contemporary front door in Sussex with medium hardwood flooring, a single front door, a white front door and grey floors.
Shoe store - sewhomely

Design ideas for a country hallway in Gloucestershire with beige walls, terracotta flooring, a single front door, a white front door and beige floors.

Alterations to an idyllic Cotswold Cottage in Gloucestershire. The works included complete internal refurbishment, together with an entirely new panelled Dining Room, a small oak framed bay window extension to the Kitchen and a new Boot Room / Utility extension.
floor - webuser_967919995

Design ideas for an eclectic entrance in London.

Design ideas for an eclectic entrance in London.
It seems that at the end of the lower part of the staircase gives entrance to a room - mamunchi

Inspiration for a traditional boot room in Gloucestershire with lino flooring and multi-coloured floors.

Amanda Turner
Inspiration for a traditional boot room in Gloucestershire with lino flooring and multi-coloured floors.
Back door - baskets on shelf, hooks, pull out baskets, lift up seat? - julflem12

Design ideas for a medium sized traditional vestibule in London with beige walls, a double front door, a white front door and beige floors.

GAphotography by Alessandra Gerardi
Design ideas for a medium sized traditional vestibule in London with beige walls, a double front door, a white front door and beige floors.
love warm wall colours - dianarowell

Classic boot room in London with grey walls.

An elegant contemporary interpretation of traditional hand-painted style, with a fresh yet sophisticated feel, classic proportions and modern powerhouse equipment Photo: Jake Fitzjones
Use of space, seating , maybe not so much hooks could be post section etc - parmie_bains_mavi

Photo of a traditional boot room in London with a single front door and a grey front door.

Photo of a traditional boot room in London with a single front door and a grey front door.
good idea - and on a large porch onto the front door where boots and coats etc can live and it also serves as keeping drafts out - jess_gray55

This is an example of a contemporary entrance in London with white walls and multi-coloured floors.

Philip Vile
This is an example of a contemporary entrance in London with white walls and multi-coloured floors.

This is an example of a scandinavian boot room in London with white walls and carpet.

This is an example of a scandinavian boot room in London with white walls and carpet.
A further encouragement to shoe removal is a place to perch to do it. The shoe storage itself can be the seating – built in, as here, or via a freestanding piece of furniture that’s stash space and seat in one. - jrpheby

This is an example of a small classic boot room in Surrey with green walls, light hardwood flooring and a single front door.

A Charlie Kingham authentically true bespoke boot room design. Handpainted classic bench with boot shoe storage, as well as matching decorative wall shelf. Including Iron / Pewter Ironmongery Hooks.
Under stairs coat and shoe area - gabrielle49

This is an example of a country front door in Wiltshire with a single front door, a white front door and beige walls.

This is an example of a country front door in Wiltshire with a single front door, a white front door and beige walls.
I want to make this one front of my house - webuser_56633958134

This is an example of a farmhouse entrance in Dorset with grey walls, limestone flooring, a single front door and a medium wood front door.

Polly Eltes
This is an example of a farmhouse entrance in Dorset with grey walls, limestone flooring, a single front door and a medium wood front door.
Basket at entry for umbrellas... - maya_nair86

Inspiration for a large traditional boot room in Gloucestershire.

CIRENCESTER, GLOUCESTERSHIRE This Queen Anne House, in the heart of the Cotswolds, was added to and altered in the mid 19th and 20th centuries. More recently the current owners undertook a major architectural refurbishment project to rationalise the layout and modernise the house for 21st century living. Artichoke was commissioned to design this new boot room as well as a bespoke kitchen, scullery and master dressing room. Primary materials: Hand painted furniture with antiqued oak bench seat, drawer fronts and interiors. Up and over doors running on bespoke brass tracks and glazed with hand made glass. Lost wax unpolished brass cabinet fittings.
Boot seat curves around walking stick holder - vej123

This is an example of a contemporary entrance in London with light hardwood flooring, grey walls, a single front door and a medium wood front door.

Architectural Photography by Simon Kennedy http://www.simonkennedy.net/
Like the wooden front door and open feel - amy_long17

Farmhouse entrance in London.

Michael Kyle
Farmhouse entrance in London.
Inviting entrance clean clear finished - fiona7258

Photo of an industrial entrance in Oxfordshire with black walls, a single front door and a red front door.

David Fisher at Fisher Studios
Photo of an industrial entrance in Oxfordshire with black walls, a single front door and a red front door.

Inspiration for a medium sized traditional boot room in Essex with white walls and travertine flooring.

A curious quirk of the long-standing popularity of open plan kitchen /dining spaces is the need to incorporate boot rooms into kitchen re-design plans. We all know that open plan kitchen – dining rooms are absolutely perfect for modern family living but the downside is that for every wall knocked through, precious storage space is lost, which can mean that clutter inevitably ensues. Designating an area just off the main kitchen, ideally near the back entrance, which incorporates storage and a cloakroom is the ideal placement for a boot room. For families whose focus is on outdoor pursuits, incorporating additional storage under bespoke seating that can hide away wellies, walking boots and trainers will always prove invaluable particularly during the colder months. A well-designed boot room is not just about storage though, it’s about creating a practical space that suits the needs of the whole family while keeping the design aesthetic in line with the rest of the project. With tall cupboards and under seating storage, it’s easy to pack away things that you don’t use on a daily basis but require from time to time, but what about everyday items you need to hand? Incorporating artisan shelves with coat pegs ensures that coats and jackets are easily accessible when coming in and out of the home and also provides additional storage above for bulkier items like cricket helmets or horse-riding hats. In terms of ensuring continuity and consistency with the overall project design, we always recommend installing the same cabinetry design and hardware as the main kitchen, however, changing the paint choices to reflect a change in light and space is always an excellent idea; thoughtful consideration of the colour palette is always time well spent in the long run. Lastly, a key consideration for the boot rooms is the flooring. A hard-wearing and robust stone flooring is essential in what is inevitably an area of high traffic.
We love how spacious this space is. - homewings

This is an example of a contemporary entrance in Hampshire with white walls, light hardwood flooring, a pivot front door and a medium wood front door.

Andy Stagg
This is an example of a contemporary entrance in Hampshire with white walls, light hardwood flooring, a pivot front door and a medium wood front door.
How the Colours of door/tiles and steps go with each other - thornbury17

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